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A Short History of Rudeness: Manners, Morals, and Misbehavior in Modern America

A Short History of Rudeness Manners Morals and Misbehavior in Modern America The perceived breakdown of civility has in recent years become a national obsession and our modern climate of boorishness has cultivated a host of etiquette watchdogs like Miss Manners and Martha St

  • Title: A Short History of Rudeness: Manners, Morals, and Misbehavior in Modern America
  • Author: Mark Caldwell
  • ISBN: 9780312263898
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Paperback
  • The perceived breakdown of civility has in recent years become a national obsession, and our modern climate of boorishness has cultivated a host of etiquette watchdogs, like Miss Manners and Martha Stewart, who defend us against an onslaught of nastiness Touching on aspects of both our public and private lives, including work, family, and sex, literary and social critic MThe perceived breakdown of civility has in recent years become a national obsession, and our modern climate of boorishness has cultivated a host of etiquette watchdogs, like Miss Manners and Martha Stewart, who defend us against an onslaught of nastiness Touching on aspects of both our public and private lives, including work, family, and sex, literary and social critic Mark Caldwell examines how the rules of behavior inevitably change and explains why, no matter how hard we try, we can never return to a golden era of civilized manners and s.

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      Posted by:Mark Caldwell
      Published :2020-06-09T18:22:49+00:00

    About "Mark Caldwell"

    1. Mark Caldwell

      Mark Caldwell Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Short History of Rudeness: Manners, Morals, and Misbehavior in Modern America book, this is one of the most wanted Mark Caldwell author readers around the world.

    534 Comments

    1. This is one of those annoying books whose title pretends to a much tighter focus than it has. Rather than educating us on rudeness, it ranges far and wide, touching such microtopics as the high costs of funerals, the sex life of the fruit fly, the business practice of TQM (Total Quality Management), Martha Stewart's product lines, email flaming, and Mr. Hankey, the Christmas Poo of South Park. Authors of these types of books are doing what I would term dilettanting (verb borrowed from Karen Lewi [...]


    2. The introduction to this book is quite interesting and encouraging; the reader wants more. The actual book, however, is not cohesive and leaves the reader empty and confused. The book is divided into two sections: Public Life & Private Life. But the division seems random, as do the topics covered. Caldwell's vocabulary is beyond impressive and some of the research is fascinating, but what does it all mean?


    3. This book isn't really about rudeness as much as it's about manners throughout American history. There is a difference, in my opinion. Just because someone is lacking in manners (let's say someone buys you a wedding gift that's not on your registry, for example) doesn't mean they've been rude. (Rude, in my opinion, is showing up to the wedding empty-handed and making a loud announcement that since you're likely to be divorced within a year anyway, the attendant didn't bother to buy you a gift at [...]


    4. This book is worth a read because it adds some perspective to the whole "kids these days" outlook. Really, people have always been "rude," but the author's main point is that manners are so intrinsically important that they crop up in the most unlikely places, so we shouldn't worry too much. He does ramble a lot and goes into detail about a lot of things that deviate far from the book's stated purpose, but in general I really enjoyed reading this book.


    5. This book examines how the rules of behavior inevitably change and explains why, no matter how hard we try, we can never return to a golden era of civilized manners and mores.



    6. I put A Short History of Rudeness by Mark Caldwell on my wishlist shortly after it came out. It's been on the list so long that I can't remember the reason behind adding the book or even what my initial impression of it was. When I spotted the book, a reissue, at my library I snatched it up.A Short History of Rudeness from the outset looks like it will be a slightly off color romp through a history of Americans acting poorly. While that's certainly there, it's mostly a scholarly look at the evol [...]


    7. This book is more a history of conflicting mores than of manners and rudeness. The misinterpretation then can be seen as rudeness by either party. I especially like the chapter on the workplace where management pretends we all are equal but everyone knows we are not. I think everyone has been there. The book was written in the 1990's so it is a bit out of date. Too bad the author did not write it during this past presidential election which has to be the worse display of bad manners and rudeness [...]


    8. A quick and generally entertaining read. Received no revelations on the nature of rudeness, though. I enjoyed the historical anecdotes, and then realized that this book was written in the 1990's, making itself an historical document. In some ways, the references for the "Modern America" are as dated as those of the 1890's. Nostalgic trip back to the era of Bill Clinton, Barney, Mulder and Scully and other random things I remember from the 1990's.


    9. The shorter version of this book is: "Are manners subjective and constantly evolving? Yes."Rather than being about rudeness in particular, the general state of etiquette (mainly in the 20th century) is surveyed in chapters looking at various aspects of life, such as business and parenting. There was not much here that held my interest or stuck with me after I put it down.


    10. This had an odd tone, not quite academic and yet not general reading either. It ranges beyond manners and the author was unwilling to discuss morals and values as a component. The time-frame jumps all over but focuses on the US. Overall, I found it a long-winded with saying much. (in terms of rudeness isn't that what makes a bore?)


    11. This book is not about the history of rudeness, and frankly, even after reading it I can't figure out exactly what it was supposed to be about. It jumbles together topics such as sex, child-rearing and race, but doesn't really get to any point only loosely ties "manners" to each subject.


    12. Well, the short history wasn't very short, and it really leaned more towards peoples attitudes towards manners and morals than the actual ones held by people throughout the decades. It was interesting in parts.


    13. The title sounded interesting but it ended up being very dry, outdated, and rambled terribly. No matter what the chapter title was it always turned into business etiquette. I’ve never read something that caused such lethargy before.


    14. Rather interesting, but required a lot more energy than I was ready to give. I gave up at about page 140. He really just seems to keep repeating the idea that manners are things we make up, not universal behaviors. Duh.


    15. A very dry telling of INCIDENTS of rudeness. I was rather hoping more for a sociological analyzing of how and why rudeness has come to be what it is in America currently. Some of the incidents are interesting, but not what I had hoped to find.


    16. I adored this book because it was a concise quick read that actually challenged the social, class, and racial underpinnings of the behavior patterns known as manners and really made the reader think.



    17. The idea behind this book was far more interesting than its pages ended up being. It was a bit murky and didn't live up to its title.


    18. Comprehensive overview of the constant evolution of what constitutes good manners, how that relates to morality, and broken up in good sized chunks for discussion. Very good, and well-researched.


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