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Reimagining Japan: The Quest for a Future That Works

Reimagining Japan The Quest for a Future That Works None

  • Title: Reimagining Japan: The Quest for a Future That Works
  • Author: Brian Salsberg Clay Chandler Heang Chhor
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 480
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • None

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      Posted by:Brian Salsberg Clay Chandler Heang Chhor
      Published :2020-09-23T00:26:47+00:00

    About "Brian Salsberg Clay Chandler Heang Chhor"

    1. Brian Salsberg Clay Chandler Heang Chhor

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    561 Comments

    1. McKinsey did a good job compiling a smorgasbord of articles that lend credibility to their goal of providing solutions for the problems Japan face today and in the future. The authors include CEOs from multinationals and Japanese nationals, foreign and domestic academics, writers and politicians. There a few throwaways that provide no insight (Alex Kerr) or simply promote their own business (Amway's CEO), but the vast majority of them quickly get to the point that Japan needs to change drastical [...]


    2. ماكينزي للاستشارات الإدارية (شركة عالمية بسمعة رفيعة) قامت بالإشراف على هذا الكتاب المهم,الفكرة فيه هي تجميع لأراء شخصيات مهمة من حول العالم في مجالات مختلفة عبر مقالات تتصور فيها ماضي وحاضر ومستقبل اليابان,لماذا عانت اليابان من جبال الديون في ازمتها المالية مطلع التسعينيا [...]


    3. This collation of micro essays is not for those of us who are avid Japan observers and/or are already familiar with the writings of the authors' works or their views on Japan. If you are one of these people than reading the fulminations of Rakuten's Mikitani and Fast Retailing's Yanai demanding that Japanese change their ways will be nothing new to you. Neither will Dower's views of the non-uniqueness of Japan (and Vogels views of the uniqueness of Japan) or Kerr's disappointment in the country. [...]


    4. Also still in the middle of this book. It is long.It's one of those books, I can not read a lot of at once. I usually read one easy and then chew on that for a while. It's opened my eyes to a lot of the problems in Japanese society and a lot of potential solutions for them. Some of the solutions are a bit repetitious. And things move so slow bureaucratically it's hard not to become cynical about it all.


    5. It's a good book that discusses the impact of the disasters on Japan's society and economy; it's composed of essays written by experts in various fields that offer ideas on how Japan can move forward given the challenges of an aging society, slumping economy, and disaster recovery.


    6. Finally finished the book after a very long break. Not all the essays were good, but plowing through them sort of gave me a clearer picture of the various issues and challenges Japan is facing today.


    7. I do agree that the author did a good job in collecting pieces, but apart from few stories, most of them sounds too biased. Or . . . is that what this book supposed to be? That I don't know.


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