Books

Italian Hours

Italian Hours The charm of certain vacant grassy spaces in Italy overfrowned by masses of brickwork that are honeycombed by the suns of centuries is something that I hereby renounce once for all the attempt to e

  • Title: Italian Hours
  • Author: Henry James John Auchard
  • ISBN: 9780140435078
  • Page: 229
  • Format: Paperback
  • The charm of certain vacant grassy spaces, in Italy, overfrowned by masses of brickwork that are honeycombed by the suns of centuries, is something that I hereby renounce once for all the attempt to express but you may be sure that whenever I mention such a spot enchantment lurks in it Henry James In these essays on travels in Italy written from 1872 to 1909, Henry J The charm of certain vacant grassy spaces, in Italy, overfrowned by masses of brickwork that are honeycombed by the suns of centuries, is something that I hereby renounce once for all the attempt to express but you may be sure that whenever I mention such a spot enchantment lurks in it Henry James In these essays on travels in Italy written from 1872 to 1909, Henry James explores art and religion, political shifts and cultural revolutions, and the nature of travel itself James s enthusiastic appreciation of the unparalleled aesthetic allure of Venice, the vitality of Rome, and the noisy, sensuous appeal of Naples is everywhere marked by pervasive regret for the disappearance of the past and by ambivalence concerning the transformation of nineteenth century Europe John Auchard s lively introduction and extensive notes illuminate the surprising differences between the historical, political, and artistic Italy of James s travels and the metaphoric Italy that became the setting of some of his best known works of fiction This edition includes an appendix of James s book reviews on Italian travel writing John Auchard s introduction and notes give the book a double function the literary masterpiece is retained but acquires a practical function for the modern traveler Leon Edel

    • [PDF] Download ¸ Italian Hours | by ↠ Henry James John Auchard
      229 Henry James John Auchard
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ¸ Italian Hours | by ↠ Henry James John Auchard
      Posted by:Henry James John Auchard
      Published :2021-01-16T03:49:12+00:00

    About "Henry James John Auchard"

    1. Henry James John Auchard

      Henry James, OM, son of theologian Henry James Sr brother of the philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James, was an American born author, one of the founders and leaders of a school of realism in fiction He spent much of his life in England and became a British subject shortly before his death He is primarily known for a series of major novels in which he portrayed the encounter of America with Europe His plots centered on personal relationships, the proper exercise of power in such relationships, and other moral questions His method of writing from the point of view of a character within a tale allowed him to explore the phenomena of consciousness and perception, and his style in later works has been compared to impressionist painting.James insisted that writers in Great Britain and America should be allowed the greatest freedom possible in presenting their view of the world, as French authors were His imaginative use of point of view, interior monologue and unreliable narrators in his own novels and tales brought a new depth and interest to realistic fiction, and foreshadowed the modernist work of the twentieth century An extraordinarily productive writer, in addition to his voluminous works of fiction he published articles and books of travel writing, biography, autobiography, and criticism,and wrote plays, some of which were performed during his lifetime with moderate success His theatrical work is thought to have profoundly influenced his later novels and tales.

    359 Comments

    1. Published slightly more than a century ago and containing essays written over a period of forty years, this collection reveals Henry James at his fondest, his love affair with Italy being everywhere evident, even when he is not shy about revealing the shortcomings and flaws of the country and its people. He opens the volume with essays about Venice, and his perceptive vision and fine ear for language conjure such a faithful picture of the city that those who have been there in person are immedia [...]


    2. This volume contains the novella The Aspern Papers, and two shorter pieces that almost read like travel writing, The Diary of a Man of Fifty and Travelling Companions. All three conjure up the atmosphere of American ex-pat communities living in style in Florence, Rome and Venice at the end of the nineteenth century.


    3. If you love HJ's style and are charmed by Italian cities and towns, this is a must read. But, if you find James' writing unbearable, regardless of how much you adore Italy, don't bother -- he's as fusty, complex, and interminable as ever here. And I was smiling on every page.


    4. This man was an unbelievably good writer. His descriptions were poetic and simple and precise. Wonderful book for lovers of Italy.


    5. I originally got this book with the intention of reading James' memoirs of his time in Italy from front to back. For those who managed to do so, kudos. However, as you may expect from James, it is quite wordy and after a while you can find yourself feeling quite swamped - and so I have found it much more pleasant to use the section headings and index to find the relevant passages and read them as a I travel to those places myself. Since it was not written chronologically in the first place and i [...]


    6. This book irritated me in the extreme and I had to give up after 20% after reading the parts about Venice, then some later parts about Milan. To say this book was overly verbose would be an understatement. Reading Henry James is somewhat reminiscent of reading a long-winded Google translation of some prosaic Japanese in English. Almost all direction and meaning is hidden behind a flurry of adjectives and the kind of wishy-washy twaddle that only art critics can concoct. In addition to this, the [...]


    7. So I set out to make my reading list for our Italy trip and really liked some of the snippets I came across when flipping through Italian Hours. I'll admit that it sometimes read like Italian Hours and Hours and Hours, but those little bits that so captured the sights and experiences that we were also having in Italy kept me going. I gathered some quotes throughout that I'm planning on putting in our photo album. I liked the witty and humourous moments, especially James's description of the pa [...]


    8. Though this book was very interestingI loved the subject matterd it contained many beautifully written descriptions, personal thoughts an thought provoking momentsI do have to say I found it a bit boring, longwinded and very pretentiousI found myself skipping around a lot trying to find sections that I could enjoy


    9. I began reading this while in Italy this year. . d then had to finish. . . if you don't like James. . .well, it's all James all the time in this nonfiction collection of James' Italian memories. . . there are beautiful paragraphs, even gorgeous pages, but there are dry spots as well. . d James' patronizing attitude can at times be annoying.


    10. Perfect bedtime reading, if you're hoping to dream about impossibly precious time-travel vacations for aesthetes, or wondering how much better your real-life vacation to Florence and Rome would have been in the late nineteenth century.


    11. Impossible to review.I read it primarily for description of the places I was living in and visiting. Some of it is lovely, some amusing, much is art review of a rather precious sort. Skimmed large sections, enjoyed others. Would not read again, unless research.


    12. I Frisbeed this to the ground after about 40 pages. The literary equivalent of watching your neighbors' home movies from the month they spent in Europe. This is only recommended for the most hardcore of Henry James fans.





    13. I tried, I really tried. And while the first few pages were lovely eventually the endless rambling descriptions wore me down and I had to give this one up.


    14. Old-fashioned travelogue by a great writer. I read various portions of before and during a return trip to Italy-git the texture, depth, and context I wanted.


    15. aside from the fact that James felt the poverty of Venetians at the time was a good thing because it gave the place its ambience, it was just so repetitiveI felt sea-sick after awhile.



    Leave a Comment