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Last Segregated Hour: The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation

Last Segregated Hour The Memphis Kneel Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation On Palm Sunday at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis a group of black and white students began a kneel in to protest the church s policy of segregation a protest that would continue in

  • Title: Last Segregated Hour: The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation
  • Author: Stephen R. Haynes
  • ISBN: 9780195395051
  • Page: 469
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On Palm Sunday 1964, at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a group of black and white students began a kneel in to protest the church s policy of segregation, a protest that would continue in one form or another for than a year and eventually force the church to open its doors to black worshippers In The Last Segregated Hour, Stephen Haynes tells the storyOn Palm Sunday 1964, at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a group of black and white students began a kneel in to protest the church s policy of segregation, a protest that would continue in one form or another for than a year and eventually force the church to open its doors to black worshippers In The Last Segregated Hour, Stephen Haynes tells the story of this dramatic yet little studied tactic which was the strategy of choice for bringing attention to segregationist policies in Southern churches Kneel ins involved surprise visits to targeted churches, usually during Easter season, and often resulted in physical standoffs with resistant church people The spectacle of kneeling worshippers barred from entering churches made for a powerful image that invited both local and national media attention The Memphis kneel ins of 1964 65 were unique in that the protesters included white students from the local Presbyterian college Southwestern, now Rhodes And because the protesting students presented themselves in groups that were mixed by race and gender, white church members saw the visitations as a hostile provocation and responded with unprecedented efforts to end them But when Church officials pressured Southwestern president Peyton Rhodes to call off his students or risk financial reprisals, he responded that Southwestern is not for sale Drawing on a wide range of sources, including extensive interviews with the students who led the kneel ins, Haynes tells an inspiring story that will appeal not only to scholars of religion and history, but also to pastors and church people concerned about fostering racially diverse congregations.

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      469 Stephen R. Haynes
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      Posted by:Stephen R. Haynes
      Published :2020-03-09T14:57:50+00:00

    About "Stephen R. Haynes"

    1. Stephen R. Haynes

      Stephen R. Haynes Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Last Segregated Hour: The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation book, this is one of the most wanted Stephen R. Haynes author readers around the world.

    470 Comments

    1. Haynes, a Rhodes College professor, highlights the segregation crisis of 1964-1965 in Protestant churches in the South by telling the story of the "Kneel-In" campaigns across the south, primarily composed of college age student protestors, particularly in Memphis and particularly at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a suburban wealthy white church, that actually started in downtown Memphis but as it grew, the church moved to the suburbs. I love this book for many reasons. Kneel-Ins were [...]


    2. A sobering but worthwhile read. Important history for those interested in race in the church broadly, but particularly in Memphis or conservative Presbyterian.


    3. Very challenging read. I recommend every evangelical in Memphis at least read a few chapters of this book to become familiar with the story. The first few chapters are excellent. While the middle section is excellent as well, it reads very much like a history textbook (which very well may have been the author's intention). Therefore, while it is thorough, it provides more details than are necessary for the overall scope of the narrative. Like the first few chapters, the end of the book is very m [...]


    4. I was keen on the subject matter because I didn't know anything about these protest prayer kneel-ins targeting segregated churches in the south. The book was full of detailed facts, dates, names etc and it followed several church congregations. For this reason I found it hard to identify with the individuals described. I didn't feel I really understood why they chose to act and who they were. In some instances we weren't even given the characters and the narrative describes the actions of "two b [...]


    5. This is a good book on a topic about which I knew nothing before reading it. It talks about "kneel-ins" at southern churches between 1963-1965. African American ans white students went to southern churches on Sunday mornings, often being refused entry. The book focuses especially on Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis. In addition to telling the history of kneel-ins there, the author looks at the story from the perspective of protesters, clergy, congregants against segregation, those for segre [...]


    6. A must-read for Memphians. Not terribly well- written, but the subject is absolutely compelling. It is a peek into the many many layers and variations of racial perspectives in the southern church in the mid-1960s. Haynes also identifies lingering ways that race plays a powerful, usually unnamed role in church politics. It was a disconcerting yet hopeful paradox.



    7. Particularly difficult for me to read. The church I attend began out of such an evil place of man's heart. Such important historical value for Memphis and Christians.


    8. Interesting perspective on the Civil Rights Movement in Memphis from the religious point-of-view. At times, it felt very "text bookish." This made it a chore to read.




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