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God's Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights

God s Long Summer Stories of Faith and Civil Rights In the summer of the turmoil of the civil rights movement reached its peak in Mississippi with activists across the political spectrum claiming that God was on their side in the struggle over r

  • Title: God's Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights
  • Author: Charles Marsh
  • ISBN: 9780691029405
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the summer of 1964, the turmoil of the civil rights movement reached its peak in Mississippi, with activists across the political spectrum claiming that God was on their side in the struggle over racial justice This was the summer when violence against blacks increased at an alarming rate and when the murder of three civil rights workers in Mississippi resulted in natiIn the summer of 1964, the turmoil of the civil rights movement reached its peak in Mississippi, with activists across the political spectrum claiming that God was on their side in the struggle over racial justice This was the summer when violence against blacks increased at an alarming rate and when the murder of three civil rights workers in Mississippi resulted in national media attention Charles Marsh takes us back to this place and time, when the lives of activists on all sides of the civil rights issue converged and their images of God clashed He weaves their voices into a gripping narrative a Ku Klux Klansman, for example, borrows fiery language from the Bible to link attacks on blacks to his priestly calling a middle aged woman describes how the Gospel inspired her to rally other African Americans to fight peacefully for their dignity a SNCC worker tells of harrowing encounters with angry white mobs and his pilgrimage toward a new racial spirituality called Black Power Through these emotionally charged stories, Marsh invites us to consider the civil rights movement anew, in terms of religion as a powerful yet protean force driving social action.The book s central figures are Fannie Lou Hamer, who worked for Jesus in civil rights activism Sam Bowers, the Imperial Wizard of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi William Douglas Hudgins, an influential white Baptist pastor and unofficial theologian of the closed society Ed King, a white Methodist minister and Mississippi native who campaigned to integrate Protestant congregations and Cleveland Sellers, a SNCC staff member turned black militant.Marsh focuses on the events and religious convictions that led each person into the political upheaval of 1964 He presents an unforgettable American social landscape, one that is by turns shameful and inspiring In conclusion, Marsh suggests that it may be possible to sift among these narratives and lay the groundwork for a new thinking about racial reconciliation and the beloved community He maintains that the person who embraces faith s life affirming energies will leave behind a most powerful legacy of social activism and compassion.

    • Best Read [Charles Marsh] ↠ God's Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights || [History Book] PDF ✓
      127 Charles Marsh
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Charles Marsh] ↠ God's Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights || [History Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Charles Marsh
      Published :2020-09-22T00:31:53+00:00

    About "Charles Marsh"

    1. Charles Marsh

      Marsh is professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia and director of the research community Project on Lived Theology He is the author of eight books, including God s Long Summer Stories of Faith and Civil Rights, which won the 1998 Grawemeyer Award in Religion He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.Librarian Note There is than one author in the database with this name.

    842 Comments

    1. Fascinating look at the role religion played in the Civil Rights movement. Marsh looks at some of the folks who played leading roles in the civil rights movement in Mississippi in the summer of 1964. All claimed to be Christians and yet the way they chose to participate in the movement or to react against the movement were all different.Marsh begins with Fannie Lou Hamer,a poor African-American women who had no doubts that God was on the side of the poor and oppressed. Marsh explores her politic [...]


    2. This book really takes a unique look at the civil rights movement. First off, none of the people included in this book are people I've ever heard of. None of them. Five people and all of them were unfamiliar to me, and all of them played a rather large role in the movement. Second, this looks at this from the perspective that God was with people on either side of the movement. Given that my class is interested in myth, discourse, and sentiments of affinity and/or estrangement, it was an interest [...]


    3. This project is a provocative one in the first place, and Marsh successfully executes what could be a tricky task. Rather than dismissing religion in the civil rights movement (based off the presumption that all sides justified their actions via religion, so it mustn’t be that helpful), Marsh takes the religious convictions of various actors seriously to understand “how ordinary Southern towns [became] theaters of a complex theological drama” in the summer of 1964. He examines the lives of [...]


    4. Very important reading focusing on a few key people (including a KKK leader) involved with the civil rights movement. the road to freedom is long and fraught with obstacles. These people had strong convictions and lived their lives accordingly.


    5. Wow! Stories I never knew about the characters on both sides of the fight for civil rights in the Deep South during the summer of 1964.


    6. I had to read this book for a course assignment, but I'm glad I did. It was the story of five people of faith and their roles in the civil rights movement, mostly around the summer of 1964 and in and around Alabama. Powerful subject matter and sometimes disturbing because of the violence. One chapter is about a man who is a segregationist and a leader of the Ku Klux Klan. His justification of his views, especially as a Christian, were interesting to read. I want to say he was mentally disturbed [...]


    7. An interesting view on the religious convictions that drove people on both sides during the civil rights movement. This is scholarly study so Marsh does not set out to entertain. He merely presents the facts and the story tells itself. I thought the most interesting contrast was the one Marsh presented between Fannie Lou Hamer and Sam Bower. Both were driven and drew strength from their deep religious convictions. One withstood hostility, hatred, and oppression for basic human rights. The other [...]


    8. Great book about five key figures during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Most of the stories take place in Mississippi during the year 1964. The stories of Fannie Lou Hamer, Sam Bowers, Ed King, Douglas Hudgins, and Cleveland Sellers detail how these figures incorporated religion into their actions of the time period. Whether they be for or against the movement, God seemed to play an important role in the way they thought and acted. Truly a great read. Extremely quick read as well.


    9. Just finished this book and, in light of current events, it was a fascinating read. It probes deeply into the religious beliefs fueling several keys participants in the Freedom Summer of 1964. The most interesting bits were the twisted beliefs of Sam Bowers and the lengths he had to go to in order to provide a biblical justification for white supremacy and the "head in the sand" approach of Douglas Hudgins which was indicative of mainstream white Christianity at the time.


    10. This book chronicles 6 people through a summer during the Civil Rights movement. Some of the people are very involved with the Civil Rights movement, one is the founder of the White Knights of the KKK, yet their belief in God motivates their actions. It's interesting to see how one religion can spur some people on to sacrifice their lives for the cause of justice, and others can use it to justify their injustice.


    11. Deeply convicting stories, some inspiring that show the power of faith in the struggle for social justice, and some frightening that show how easy it is to stumble into blind spots while still clinging to faith. God definitely pursues us, but we bring a whole lot of our own personality, biases, and ideas to faith.


    12. Narratives of religious leaders from the Civil Rights Movement from the year of 1964. I particularly enjoyed the chapter about Sam Bowers, a former KKK splinter group leader and convicted murderer. His chapter is terrifying.


    13. the work that inspired the idea for my undergraduate thesis on the tradition of justice in black christianity and its impact on the modern civil rights movement. not a perfect book, by any means, but significant in terms of what it birthed in me.


    14. A great book about the civil rights movement and some of it's lesser-known heroes, like Fanny Lou Hamer. An inspiring read with historical importance.






    15. I learned a lot in from this book and it made me want to read more abou that time period. I wonder how I would've stood had I been an adult then?


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