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How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth

How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth Your Guide to Understanding the BibleUnderstanding the Bible isn t for the few the gifted the scholarly The Bible is accessible It s meant to be read and comprehended by everyone from armchair reade

  • Title: How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth
  • Author: Gordon D. Fee Douglas K. Stuart
  • ISBN: 0025986246044
  • Page: 305
  • Format: Paperback
  • Your Guide to Understanding the BibleUnderstanding the Bible isn t for the few, the gifted, the scholarly The Bible is accessible It s meant to be read and comprehended by everyone from armchair readers to seminary students A few essential insights into the Bible can clear up a lot of misconceptions and help you grasp the meaning of Scripture and its application to yourYour Guide to Understanding the BibleUnderstanding the Bible isn t for the few, the gifted, the scholarly The Bible is accessible It s meant to be read and comprehended by everyone from armchair readers to seminary students A few essential insights into the Bible can clear up a lot of misconceptions and help you grasp the meaning of Scripture and its application to your 21st century life.More than half a million people have turned to How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth to inform their reading of the Bible This third edition features substantial revisions that keep pace with current scholarship, resources, and culture Changes include Updated language A new authors preface Several chapters rewritten for better readability Updated list of recommended commentaries and resourcesCovering everything from translational concerns to different genres of biblical writing, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth is used all around the world In clear, simple language, it helps you accurately understand the different parts of the Bible their meaning for ancient audiences and their implications for you today so you can uncover the inexhaustible worth that is in God s Word.

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    About "Gordon D. Fee Douglas K. Stuart"

    1. Gordon D. Fee Douglas K. Stuart

      Gordon Fee is Professor Emeritus of New Testament at Regent College, where he taught for sixteen years His teaching experience also includes serving schools in Washington, California, Kentucky, as well as Wheaton College in Illinois five years and Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary in Massachusetts twelve years Gordon Fee is a noted New Testament scholar, having published several books and articles in his field of specialization, New Testament textual criticism He also published a textbook on New Testament interpretation, co authored two books for lay people on biblical interpretation, as well as scholarly popular commentaries on 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus and on Galatians, and major commentaries on 1 Corinthians and Philippians He is also the author of a major work on the Holy Spirit and the Person of Christ in the letters of Paul Gordon Fee currently serves as the general editor of the New International Commentary series, as well as on the NIV revision committee that produced the TNIV Besides his ability as a biblical scholar, he is a noted teacher and conference speaker He has given the Staley Distinguished Christian Scholar lectures on fifteen college campuses as well as the annual NT lectures at Southwestern Baptist Seminary, North Park Seminary, the Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary, the Canadian Theological Seminary, Duke Divinity School, Golden Gate Baptist, Anderson School of Theology, Asbury Seminary, and Chrichton College An ordained minister with the Assemblies of God, Gordon Fee is well known for his manifest concern for the renewal of the church Gordon Fee is married and has four married children.

    671 Comments

    1. In all honesty, the only reason that I read this book is because it was required for a class. I'm glad that I read it and am thankful to have kept it as a reference. My only regret is that I wasn't made aware of it sooner. Having read it much sooner would have saved me decades of headache and heartache in sorting through all the twisted theologies currently parading through the modern church today. This book is about the bible and its original intention, and how to read it in that context. Fee a [...]


    2. On Sunday nights, our little group has started taking a book of the Bible each week and discussing it. Going through the the books in written order, we talk about the book’s history, intent and what its implications are for us today. We decided to do this because several in our group have a precarious relationship with Scripture. Some of of us have very little exposure to it previously. For others it’s intimidating. And some are simply deciding what their relationship to the Bible is.With th [...]


    3. This is hands-down the best treatment of hermeneutics (or bible-study or exegesis) that I've ever come across. It is written at the popular level (no Greek, Hebrew, or degree with multiple letters required) yet treats the issue far better than a great many more technical works. The authors have a singular commitment to "authorial intent" as the goal of historical exegesis. This commitment and the clear and relevant way in which they demonstrate the principles of exegesis as applied to the differ [...]


    4. I think this is the best and most important of all the books ABOUT the Bible. We are supposed to read and understand and love the word of God, but it is hard sometimes to do all of those things with a work of literature that was written thousands of years ago and half a world away. I think that most Christians tend to think that since the Bible is a book apart from all other books that it should not be read in the same way that we read other works of literature. While we should revere God's word [...]


    5. I recommend this book for any who need to learn how to read the Bible more precisely.* It was a great help for me, as it will be for you—particularly if you are accustomed to the all-too-common habit of "proof-texting"—i.e lifting verses out of context and applying them according to one's own predetermined ideas.*Note: The fact is, many Christians--even Christians who can quote verses all day long--do not know how to read the Bible well. Too many engage in "proof-texting" (see above). Readin [...]


    6. This was required reading for my Old Testament survey course in college in 2000. Hard to believe that so much time has passed since then (writing this in Jan. 2018), but I still turn to this book frequently and find it helpful. Not surprisingly, nearly every book that I have read since then about rightly handling Scripture quotes and/or cites Fee and Stuart at some point. In my mind, this is a classic primer on the subject.


    7. 4 1/2 StarsAll in all, this has been a deeply valuable reference for learning to read the Bible--and to explain to others how they can better understand it themselves and find relevant life application. On a deep study level, I'm impressed with how much its expanded my ability to discern the full historical and literary context of commonly misused/misunderstood passages and verses. I'd long understood that most abuses of biblical quotation and interpretation centered around either proof-texting, [...]


    8. It's not enough to just read the Bible you need to learn how .Some people will get very upset with the title, because after all, for the true believer, all you need is the Bible itself, right?Well, no. For one thing the Bible itself tells you that you need the Holy Spirit to help understand, so there is that.But you also need to study to show yourself approved, meditate and approach it in a humble matter. The Bible was written over 2,000 years ago and in some portions even far longer. It is pos [...]


    9. I have read a lot of books about how to study the Bible. I used this book the past 6 months to teach the Adult CE class at my church on How to Study the Bible. This is by far the best book i've read on this topic. Practical. Accessible. Insightful. I recommend this as a must read for all believers.


    10. Authors Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart have provided the evangelical community with a salient and veridical overview of hermeneutical principles that, when applied, are of great import to the study of Scripture. How to Read the Bible for All It's Worth is replete with concepts applicable to every believer, regardless of their level of theological acumen. Layman and seasoned theologians alike will find this book to be one that has lasting value as they exegete God's Word. In the current theologica [...]


    11. Wow, for a an easy to read book on how to properly understand and interpret the various genres of the books in the Bible Fee and Stuart's 'How to Read the Bible for all its Worth' is indeed worth a read. Fee and Stuart have written in a style that avoids getting bogged down in overtechnical issues which means the average Christian ought to be able to engage with this book. Yet Fee and Stuart do a marvellous job of showing the reader how each genre of the Bible functions in its own right and then [...]


    12. What was really great about this book is the simplicity of it and the willingness to tackle some of the larger issues that the church at large struggle with. There is a companion book entitled How to read the Bible book by book, and it is well worth it to have alongside reading this book.


    13. I read this book through last year, but it is a book that should be reread and even used as a reference. Everyone has a need to interpret the Bible and this book helps with tools that will help as some read but will not understand everything they read. One thing that people forget while reading is they spent laborious days interpreting the Greek and Hebrew into what now is known as the Bible. Learning to think Contextually is an area most do not consider while reading the various genres. Hermene [...]


    14. This book was fantastic. It opened my eyes to a lot of important issues in exegesis. It covers the different genres in the Bible, like epistles, narratives, poetry, etc but also covers the Mosaic law, the Gospels, Psalms, and Revelation separately. I wanted to single out a chapter that was more helpful than others, but I couldn't because they're all great. I suppose my only reservation is the chapter on Bible translations which, while helpful, reads a lot like a long advertisement for the NIV 20 [...]


    15. This is an excellent book that was recommended to me by my pastors. Although I have read the Bible through many times, the basics of interpretation were pretty much a mystery to me. These authors are very clear about exegesis and hermeneutics. I have friends who are literally afraid of any church that does not preach expositionally because they believe that is how the scriptures are distorted. I believe that whether the Bible is preached topically or expositionally that an understanding of exege [...]


    16. Fantastic from start to finish. I encourage all Christians, whether "seasoned veteran" or "newbie," this book will profoundly - yes, profoundly change how you think about the Bible, and how to read it with greater awareness and understanding. Of course, for those who believe, the Holy Spirit illuminates our understanding, but we also have the responsibility to increase our understanding through the tools available to us. And Drs. Fee and Stuart give an excellent primer to beginning the journey o [...]


    17. A must for any Bible reader. Laymen should own this book as well as any serious scholar. Fee & Stuart are both very well respected NT & OT scholars. The book lays out some foundational truths that must be learned in order for interpretation to match what was originally intended by the biblical authors. Reading the text of Scripture is not the same as understanding the text of Scripture. This book will help guide you in your understanding of Scripture. Get the 3rd edition though, I just h [...]


    18. If you're a fan of the King James translation, then you WON'T like this book (which tosses out the KJV/NKJV, giving preference to the NIV/TNIV). However, the book gives a survey of the reasons why the KJV should be substituted for a newer translation. Also, as indicated by the title, the book does eventually discuss biblical interpretation (albeit, superficially). The best part of the book is the appendix, listing several sources for further, in-depth, study.


    19. I learned a great deal from this book. This is an overview of the Bible and provides a way of approaching the Bible from its literary and historical context. I've had a pretty strong suspicion of theologians for years and I think for good reason; but any Bible student becomes a bit of a theologian just by reading the Word and forming views and opinions about what we've read. There are some practical guidelines offered in this book that I think are useful.


    20. I would not usually say any non-fiction is amazing, but this one is really helpful. It is well written and clarifies so much. The authors give great advice, but more than that they help give you tools you can use to begin to understand and demystify the scriptures for yourself. I almost always try to refresh myself before doing a Bible study or preaching with this handy guide. Very useful and user friendly. Chapters are divided most intuitively.


    21. I read this for school, but being raised Catholic I never got to the core of what the Bible really entailed. This book helps in understanding biblical text and explains the need for a good interpretation of it. If you want to explore spirituality and learn more about God this book will be very helpful.


    22. I love this book. In addition to the Bible itself, this is one book that every person should read, especially those who are believers. It helped me understand basic issues surrounding biblical interpretation and, in many ways, changed (for the better) the way I read the Bible.



    23. If teaching disciples to read the Bible for themselves is the most important task pastors, teachers, churches can perform then I believe most have failed. I grew up in a conservative Southern Baptist church context that taught the innerancy and importance of reading Scripture daily and studying it corporately, but never once had a lesson in exegesis, hermeneutics, biblical theology, etc. I was fairly well-versed in theologically-rich works by John Piper and Jonathan Edwards in college, as well a [...]


    24. If teaching disciples to read the Bible for themselves is the most important task pastors, teachers, churches can perform then I believe most have failed. I grew up in a conservative Southern Baptist church context that taught the innerancy and importance of reading Scripture daily and studying it corporately, but never once had a lesson in exegesis, hermeneutics, biblical theology, etc. I was fairly well-versed in theologically-rich works by John Piper and Jonathan Edwards in college, as well a [...]


    25. What were some new insights you gained from this book? Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart fill their text How to read the Bible for all its worth with great advice for analyzing the scripture, and nuggets of wisdom for both the novice and experienced reader. Since I consider myself in the former category, I was satisfied with the amount of new content I learned. I could share many new insights, but I will select just a few.This may seem like a small item, but the way Fee and Stuart differentiated [...]


    26. In How to Read the Bible For All Its Worth, Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart attempt to help the reader understand and interpret the Bible with particular consideration of the genre of each book.The first chapter covers general principles for reading and understanding the Bible: exegesis, “the careful, systematic study of Scripture to discover the original, intended meaning,” which involves learning “to read the text carefully and to ask the right questions of the text,” questions of con [...]


    27. This book deals with how to read the Bible beyond a superficial level and actually dig into what the text means. The authors begin the book by stating why this is so important: the Bible is a very different book written in a very different way; it is a book that we naturally interpret as we read(p. 23). Also in this first chapter, they deal with what exegesis and hermeneutics are (27-35): understanding the original intent of the words of the Bible and what that means for the reader today. Chapte [...]


    28. There's a lot of good material here for reading Scripture in light of genre and context, and I think it's worth picking up for that alone. It's well written, well organized, and there's a lot to recommend about the chapters that cover context and style. Christians often misrepresent Christ's parables, for instance, by missing his audience, and they end up getting a very different message than Christ intended.My main concern is with the gender language issues that the authors get into. At least o [...]


    29. Reading the Bible for All Its Worth is a very accessible guide to biblical interpretation. And though the subject is approached from an Evangelical perspective, the principles outlined by Fee and Stuart apply at least fundamentally to all walks of the Christian faith. These principles are necessary for a proper interpretation of the Bible and should be known by all Christians. This book is a great aid in safeguarding the truth of the Scriptures from ridiculous and uneducated interpretations and [...]


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