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Free to Make: How the Maker Movement is Changing Our Schools, Our Jobs, and Our Minds

Free to Make How the Maker Movement is Changing Our Schools Our Jobs and Our Minds Dale Dougherty creator of MAKE magazine and the Maker Faire provides a guided tour of the

  • Title: Free to Make: How the Maker Movement is Changing Our Schools, Our Jobs, and Our Minds
  • Author: Dale Dougherty Ariane Conrad Tim O'Reilly
  • ISBN: 9781623170745
  • Page: 432
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dale Dougherty, creator of MAKE magazine and the Maker Faire, provides a guided tour of the.

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      Published :2020-03-04T23:22:21+00:00

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    1. Dale Dougherty Ariane Conrad Tim O'Reilly

      Dale Dougherty Ariane Conrad Tim O'Reilly Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Free to Make: How the Maker Movement is Changing Our Schools, Our Jobs, and Our Minds book, this is one of the most wanted Dale Dougherty Ariane Conrad Tim O'Reilly author readers around the world.

    374 Comments


    1. Interesting overview of where the Maker Movement currently is and where it has come from. Similarly to others, I was interested in seeing what I could takeaway and apply for my library work, but there is less practical application and more mental and emotional takeaway for me. I also found it too long and wish it was actually two books: one about the maker philosophy and the other with all the case studies. I felt that its core message of everyone being a maker and what that means gets lost in t [...]


    2. Practical handbook and guide to those entering the world of "Making" for the first time. Written by editor of the premiere periodical "MAKE" and creator of Maker Faire. Paperback was very affordable. Readers will find this to be a "go to" book for information regarding the Makerspace Movement.


    3. A history of the maker movement with excellent resources for schools and communities interested in bringing a maker mentality to their community. I like that it keeps the focus on the process of making.


    4. Good book that weaves the history, direction, makers, and everything together. It does take some awareness to realize the book is shifting. Good read if you want to know more about it.


    5. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.I really enjoyed this! I'm currently a substitute teacher in public schools and I've been having some concerns over how much technology is used in our schools and how little creativity the students are encouraged to come up with. This book is a start in the right direction. My hope is that it will be followed up with a "how to implement" the Maker Movement. Explaining it is one thing, but I want to see how it can be put into pr [...]


    6. If you’re a librarian, teacher, educator, or maker looking for information on how to go about building a makerspace or even making a case for a makerspace, you likely won’t find much of use here. Free to Make is full of fascinating case studies, but it doesn’t deliver what it advertises. Though easy to read and inspiring in many places, the contents are not what I’d lean on for any research on the topic.


    7. A nice overview of what the maker movement is, who is involved, what it entails and why it is vital to the future. Might not be revelatory to those who already consider themselves makers, but it would be a good one to hand to a school administrator or city official if you're trying to make a case for supporting making in your community.


    8. 600 Doughert 9/2016 Nonfiction I was interested in what our library was creating labeled Maker. The book cleared up the concept.Then pg 214 mentioned Skills USA and Henry Ford Museum (Michigan connection personal)


    9. Review closer to publication. However, I was expecting more in the way of "how to" rather than "what is". This would be great as an argument for starting a Maker Space at a school or library, but it does not contain a lot of practical application.



    10. Good book. Would have gotten four stars except for a major copy editing fail where the word "mindset" was apparently replaced with a space every time it was supposed to appear for more than a chapter.


    11. Broad overview of the Maker Movement, with some discussion of schools and public libraries. Emphasis on tinkering as learning. Good passages to bring to a discussion on building a makerspace or learning commons, but less so with the specifics.


    12. A phenomenal, comprehensive insight into the Maker movement that manages to simultaneously inspire, inform, and entertain. I can't wait to continue Making and encourage others to do the same!


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