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The House at Old Vine

The House at Old Vine Beginning in the fifteenth century and concluding at the time of the Restoration this is the second volume in the House trilogy The House at Old Vine is a colourful account of a turbulent period in E

  • Title: The House at Old Vine
  • Author: Norah Lofts
  • ISBN: 9781842321430
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Paperback
  • Beginning in the fifteenth century and concluding at the time of the Restoration, this is the second volume in the House trilogy The House at Old Vine is a colourful account of a turbulent period in English history containing religious persecution, war, rebellion and social change The house in Suffolk is a dramatic link between the six characters who inhabit it duringBeginning in the fifteenth century and concluding at the time of the Restoration, this is the second volume in the House trilogy The House at Old Vine is a colourful account of a turbulent period in English history containing religious persecution, war, rebellion and social change The house in Suffolk is a dramatic link between the six characters who inhabit it during this period and whose heartfelt stories we are told.

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      Published :2020-05-12T18:07:34+00:00

    About "Norah Lofts"

    1. Norah Lofts

      Also published using the pseudonyms Juliet Astley and Peter CurtisNorah Lofts, n e Norah Robinson, 27 August 1904 10 September 1983 was a 20th century best selling British author She wrote over fifty books specialising in historical fiction, but she also wrote non fiction and short stories Many of her novels, including her Suffolk Trilogy, follow the history of a specific house and the residents that lived in it.Lofts was born in Shipdham, Norfolk in England She also wrote under the pen names Peter Curtis and Juliet Astley Norah Lofts chose to release her murder mystery novels under the pen name Peter Curtis because she did not want the readers of her historic fiction to pick up a murder mystery novel and expect classic Norah Lofts historical fiction However, the murders still show characteristic Norah Lofts elements Most of her historical novels fall into two general categories biographical novels about queens, among them Anne Boleyn, Isabella of Castile, and Catherine of Aragon and novels set in East Anglia centered around the fictitious town of Baildon patterned largely on Bury St Edmunds Her creation of this fictitious area of England is reminiscent of Thomas Hardy s creation of Wessex and her use of recurring characters such that the protagonist of one novel appears as a secondary character in others is even reminiscent of William Faulkner s work set in Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi Norah Lofts work set in East Anglia in the 1930s and 1940s shows great concern with the very poor in society and their inability to change their conditions Her approach suggests an interest in the social reformism that became a feature of British post war society.Several of her novels were turned into films Jassy was filmed as Jassy 1947 starring Margaret Lockwood and Dennis Price You re Best Alone was filmed as Guilt is My Shadow 1950 The Devil s Own also known as The Little Wax Doll and Catch As Catch Can was filmed as The Witches 1966 The film 7 Women was directed by John Ford and based on the story Chinese Finale by Norah Lofts.

    545 Comments

    1. WHEW! I cannot wait to start #3 House at Sunset. This one is a 4.5 star. I rounded up because it holds some of my most favorite characters in all of Norah Lofts' HUGE output. This is the Townhouse in Baildon (Suffolk) which was begun by Martin Reed upon diseased vineyard land. It grows over centuries to "Old Vine" a hostel/inn and then to a boys' school. But it is in great flux once again now at the ending of this center portion of this House series trio.The characters in this one are epic, IMHO [...]


    2. I love reading these typical Norah Lofts books that go through the generations. So interesting, though I must confess, fairly depressing in many of the chapters.The coolest thing though, is that I happened to find this book at a used bookstore in Bern who had English paperbacks for 1 frank. And after a few short minutes of browsing, while my kids are waiting impatiently, I found two books by one of my favorite authors! What a great day.


    3. In a trilogy that spans five centuries - beginning in the fourteenth century and concluding during the middle of the twentieth century - this is the second volume of the Suffolk House Trilogy. This is the continuing story of a town house and the various people who live there. The trilogy follows the story of Martin Reed and his descendants, men and women who found their place in the fascinating years of England's early history.Starting in the late fifteenth century, and concluding during the tim [...]


    4. There seems to be much more bitterness in this volume than in the first (The Town House), which was all the sweeter for Maude Reed's Tale. However, this volume of the series was quite interesting.


    5. I'm sure I've read this book and its companions more than once, and may yet read them again. A house, especially an English house, has many inhabitants through its useful life, and these books follow the house through several centuries. History, romance, intrigue -- these books have it all, along with Lofts' mastery of setting. Highly recommended.


    6. Still very much enjoying this ambitious and well written historical trilogy which follows the fortunes of the inhabitants of The Old Vine. It's almost like a series of short stories - a format I'm not normally keen on - but in this case it works so well because of the ongoing links between the protagonists of each story.


    7. This story covers 6 generations that all have ties to the home Old Vine. It is broken down into each persons story. I enjoyed the tales and would have rated it higher - except the ending left me dissatisfied. It was almost like the author tired of her tale and just ended the story.




    8. The book is about: THE second of the house-trilogy, covering the 15th to the 18th century centred on a house.I liked: it depicts real people and throughout the chapters we see what the 'beautiful young heroine' turns out to be when she becomes old and how stories around her get passed down from generation to generation. Some (for me) little known aspects of English history appear like the drying of the marshes.I didn't like: some characters are evidently good or bad and therefore a little shallo [...]


    9. Lovely story and you can't stop reading it. You feel that you have known the persons depicted in real life. Always sad when we move on to a new family story, because I can't help wondering what happened next. Shows how well written it is. Norah Lofts is a very good author.


    10. Lofts is an excellent writer. She handles a variety of characters believably and her execution of the historicity is masterful.However, you'd think she was very bitter towards men and marriage and had a detestation for fat people.Like The Townhouse, this is another distillation of life across many generations all set within the setting of Old Vine. It's depressing that not one of the relationships of these people is positive. They all end, or even begin, very badly. Mercenary. Self-preserving. I [...]


    11. An excellent historical novel, the second in a trilogy, of English medieval life, preceded by "The Town House," and followed by "The House at Sunset." The story is mostly about characters with a nod to the historical setting. It is centered on the House at Old Vine and different generations who lived there. The first time I read the trilogy was shortly after I was married forty-seven years ago.


    12. Found it a bit longwinded and drawn out, there was little character continuity, and I struggle to enjoy a book when there is no consistent main characters. It was however interesting to se the progression of the houseover several cenuries, but the family relations were a little confusing!


    13. This is the second book in the Suffolk trilogy and has a darker feel than the first book. Then again the times depicted were somewhat darker so maybe its meant to mirror that. A very worthy follow on from The Townhouse and extremely enjoyable to read.


    14. A re-read.I am so interested by the very concept of this trilogy - I would like to write my own story of a house! The book/s are a good story, solidly crafted if a bit lacking in fire but the concept really grabs me.


    15. Another from my favourite trilogy. 1st, 2nd or 3rd? I'm not sure because it's a couple of years since I read them. I've found so many new authors since I joined .






    16. Great read, wonderful charactersEnjoyed enormously . read it many years ago, it still captured my imagination. Looking forward to reading The House at Sunset.



    17. Book two in the Norah Loft's "House trilogy." Interesting historical fiction involving all the people and events connected to an English house from it's building in the 1400's to modern times.



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