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The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet's Memoir of Living Off the Grid

The Road Washes Out in Spring A Poet s Memoir of Living Off the Grid For nearly twenty five years poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or running water They grew much of their own food carried water by hand and read by the

  • Title: The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet's Memoir of Living Off the Grid
  • Author: Baron Wormser
  • ISBN: 9781584656074
  • Page: 236
  • Format: Hardcover
  • For nearly twenty five years, poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or running water They grew much of their own food, carried water by hand, and read by the light of kerosene lamps They considered themselves part of the back to the land movement, but their choice to live off the grid was neither statement nor protest they simplFor nearly twenty five years, poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or running water They grew much of their own food, carried water by hand, and read by the light of kerosene lamps They considered themselves part of the back to the land movement, but their choice to live off the grid was neither statement nor protest they simply had built their house too far from the road and could not afford to bring in power lines Over the years, they settled in to a life that centered on what Thoreau called the essential facts In this graceful meditation, Wormser similarly spurns ideology in favor of observation, exploration, and reflection When we look for one thread of motive, he writes, we are, in all likelihood, deceiving ourselves His refusal to be satisfied with the obvious explanation, the single thread of motive, makes him a keen and sympathetic observer of his neighbors and community, a perceptive reader of poetry and literature, and an honest and unselfconscious analyst of his own responses to the natural world The result is a series of candid personal essays on community and isolation, nature, civilization, and poetry them Wood heat was bearable the lack of a refrigerator was a bother but bearable but an outhouse was not bearable Even a pleasantly appointed outhouse like ours, a two seater with screened windows that offered a view of the piney woods that sloped down to the road and that stood at the end of a winding path lined with ferns and striped maples, was still an indignity Even an outhouse with a sizable overhang to keep off the weather and a toilet paper holder that consisted of a nail on the back wall that was high up enough to deter mice from nesting in the roll was still an outhouse Even an outhouse that displayed a laminated invitation to a Paris Review cocktail party and that had a bucket of lime in it to throw on what was gathering below to kill off any offensive odors was still an outhouse What about January people would ask You could feel the dread in their voices.

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      Published :2021-01-14T03:27:14+00:00

    About "Baron Wormser"

    1. Baron Wormser

      Baron Wormser Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet's Memoir of Living Off the Grid book, this is one of the most wanted Baron Wormser author readers around the world.

    610 Comments

    1. This is a rare treat for a great poet to share some lessons on life that links to his strengths as a poet. In this series of personal essays, Wormser reflects on a 25-year period when he lived off the electric grid in the woods of northwest Maine, in the process relating his rural mode of life with his ferment as a developing poet. That mode of life included an outhouse, hand pumped water, heating with wood, no telephone, and lighting by kerosene lamps. Despite his urban roots from Baltimore, he [...]


    2. I heard Baron read a few pages of this last summer and I was sold. It meanders quite a bit, but this is what I like about musing poets. This book feels like drinking wine over several nights by the fire while someone tells you stories about an earlier life. I like how the poetry is woven into the caning, chopping of wood and gossip about the neighbors. Very Thoreau and Walden and Whitman. Very New England (Maine).


    3. Interesting treatise on Wormser's life living off-grid in a house in the woods in a little town way up in Maine with his wife and children. As much as he enthused about really not minding the endless chopping of wood and tried to make going to the outhouse in the middle of a winter night sound alluring, he was honest enough that I had no interest in living that life, though I would have loved to have stopped by for a visit.What I liked most about this book is his comments on poetry - I've read t [...]


    4. In the 60s, poet Baron Wormser and his wife bought 48 acres in the Maine woods where they lived for over 23 years without electricity or running water. They raised two children, held jobs in the nearby small town, and participated in the civic and cultural life. This meditation on that time reflects a life lived intentionally and reflectively--a life lived deliberately as Thoreau would have it. "We were living to make our feelings palpable, so we could inhabit them literally," writes Wormser nea [...]


    5. Those expecting discussion of poetry itself may be disappointed as that's a minor part of the book, mostly near the end. Instead, it's the story of family life in rural Maine a generation ago; the Wormsers didn't exactly intend to live without electricity and phone, but their property was far enough off the regular lines that it would've cost quite a bit to get them wired, so they decided to forego that. What to expect: explanation (examples) of how they lived, day-to-day life in small town Main [...]


    6. I liked how the author interspersed his poetic drive within each of the chapters along with his telling of homesteading in the 1970's as among the back to the land movement. He and his wife lived in their homesteaded home in Maine during the years their children were growing up. Many people who were among the back to the landers were not able to maintain homesteading with it's range of hardships. Appreciated how these two seemed to adapt well, however, he did have a job with income, making a dif [...]


    7. Baron Wormser (1948-),the librarian and poet, wrote perhaps the best book on rural living, The Road Washes Out in Spring, his account of living for 23 years with wife and daughters in a house completely off the grid: “no conventional power, no electric lines, no light switches, no faucets or spigots, no toaster or hair dryer, no flush toilet, no furnace, no hot water heater, and no monthly bill from Central Maine Power.” (p. 4)


    8. I loved this book. I loved the description of Wormser's life in central Maine, the way they literally built their life, the characters they encounter. The Mainers they describe remind me of people I know. I'm not ready to pack up and build a log cabin in Maine, but this book is a wonderful reminder of how special my state is.


    9. Excellent memoir of living off the grid intertwined with musings about poets and ideas. Its easy to notice that the author is a poet himself. The ideas in here resonated with me for a long time. I tried to read this book as slowly as possible. Much of it read like poetry I felt and I could read the odd sentence over and over.Right up there with Frost, Emerson and Whitman!Bravo.


    10. A modern day Walden, this book explores living off the grid but also poetry, religion, American culture and spirituality. If I read it again, I would read one or two vignettes a day and ponder each one rather than blazing straight through. Beautiful read.




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