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The Brass Bottle

The Brass Bottle Thomas Anstey Guthrie was an English novelist and journalist who wrote his comic novels under the pseudonym F Anstey He was educated at King s College London and at Trinity Hall Cambridg

  • Title: The Brass Bottle
  • Author: F. Anstey
  • ISBN: 9781409939719
  • Page: 266
  • Format: Paperback
  • Thomas Anstey Guthrie 1856 1934 , was an English novelist and journalist, who wrote his comic novels under the pseudonym F Anstey He was educated at King s College London and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and was called to the bar in 1880 But the popular success of his story Vice Versa 1882 with its topsy turvy substitution of a father for his schoolboy son, at once maThomas Anstey Guthrie 1856 1934 , was an English novelist and journalist, who wrote his comic novels under the pseudonym F Anstey He was educated at King s College London and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and was called to the bar in 1880 But the popular success of his story Vice Versa 1882 with its topsy turvy substitution of a father for his schoolboy son, at once made his reputation as a humourist of an original type He published in 1883 a serious novel, The Giant s Robe but, in spite of its excellence, he discovered that it was not as a serious novelist but as a humourist that the public insisted on regarding him As such his reputation was further confirmed by The Black Poodle 1884 , The Tinted Venus 1885 , and A Fallen Idol 1886 Many of Anstey s stories have been adapted into theatrical productions and motion pictures The Tinted Venus 1885 was adapted by S J Perelman, Ogden Nash, and Kurt Weill into One Touch of Venus in 1943.

    • Best Read [F. Anstey] ↠ The Brass Bottle || [Biography Book] PDF ☆
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    About "F. Anstey"

    1. F. Anstey

      Thomas Anstey Guthrie 8 August 1856 10 March 1934 , was an English novelist and journalist, who wrote his comic novels under the pseudonym F Anstey.He was born in Kensington, London, to Augusta Amherst Austen, an organist and composer, and Thomas Anstey Guthrie He was educated at King s College School and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and was called to the bar in 1880 1 But the popular success of his story Vice Versa 1882 with its topsy turvy substitution of a father for his schoolboy son, at once made his reputation as a humorist of an original type He published in 1883 a serious novel, The Giant s Robe but, in spite of its excellence, he discovered and again in 1889 with The Pariah that it was not as a serious novelist but as a humorist that the public insisted on regarding him As such, his reputation was further confirmed by The Black Poodle 1884 , The Tinted Venus 1885 , A Fallen Idol 1886 , and other works Baboo Jabberjee B.A 1897 , and A Bayard from Bengal 1902 are humorous yet truthful studies of the East Indian with a veneer of English civilization.Guthrie became an important member of the staff of Punch magazine, in which his voces populi and his humorous parodies of a reciter s stock piece Burglar Bill, c represent his best work In 1901, his successful farce The Man from Blankleys, based on a story that originally appeared in Punch, was first produced at the Prince of Wales Theatre, in London He wrote Only Toys 1903 and Salted Almonds 1906.Many of Anstey s stories have been adapted into theatrical productions and motion pictures The Tinted Venus was adapted by S J Perelman, Ogden Nash, and Kurt Weill into One Touch of Venus in 1943 Vice Versa has been filmed many times, usually transposed in setting and without any credit to the original book Another of his novels, The Brass Bottle, has also been filmed than once, including The Brass Bottle 1964.

    430 Comments

    1. Rating: 2* of fiveA 19th-century jeu d'esprit by a British journalist who aspired to serious novelisthood. He wasn't successful, since the reading public preferred his light and frothy humour to his somewhat po-faced The Giant's Robe.Unlike Thorne Smith, whose Prohibition-era supernatural comedies featuring Olympians boozing it up around Manhattan and wicked-humored idols switching the spirits of a battling man and wife still amuse, Anstey's madcap silliness hasn't retained much appeal. And then [...]


    2. This wasn't to bad, if it's compared to the other works around at this time it can certainly hold out against the competition. The outrageous story of a man who gets a brass bottle at an auction only to find a genie here-in, much hilarity ensues.Not well written but damned good fun.


    3. 2.5* The age-old question: What to wish for if I find a bottle with a genie in it? The answer turns out to be very simple - Wish that you'd never opened it.Old-fashioned fun. Just as in "Vice Versa" however, Anstey starts off with a nice clip which turns to molasses halfway through. Great plot, terrible pacing.


    4. I picked this somewhat randomly from Feedbooks for some light reading while I ride the subway. It was a mildly amusing story, with a few rather good passages near the middle, but all in all it was largely forgettable, and I wouldn't recommend anyone go out of their way to read it, unless you're especially into the genie-in-a-bottle theme, or must read anything associated with the Arabian Nights. Readers should beware that many prejudices of the author's time are reflected in the characters' atti [...]


    5. A LibriVox free audiobook that I liked the description of and whose reader I enjoy. I've just begun and have enjoyed the humor evident in the first chapter.A djinn, sealed in a jar for three thousand years, has been found by Horace Ventimore, a young and not very flourishing architect. Upon his release the djinn expresses his gratitude by seeking to grant his benefactor's every wish--generally with results the very opposite to those desired! A few movies and at least one TV series used this wor [...]


    6. A humorous novel that is a fairly interesting read. This novel inspired a couple of film versions, first a silent movie that is lost and then a 1964 film starring Tony Randal as the main character, Barbara Eden as his fiancée, and Burl Ives as the genie. The film is a decently well-made piece of fluff that is worth a lazy afternoon’s investment in time. I understand that this movie inspired Sidney Shelton to consider what it would be like if Barbara Eden had been the genie instead of Burl Ive [...]


    7. Who knew the origin of "I Dream of Jeannie" was set in Victorian-era London? Good-natured but unfortunate architect Horace accidentally releases a 5000-years bottled-up Jinnee, whose well-meaning but horribly misguided efforts to reward him nearly ruin his life in various comical ways. This Jinnie is more Robin Williams than Barbara Eden, but his stubborn ignorance of the modern Western world is what causes all the trouble for Horace.Horace's character is what made this book so readable and amus [...]


    8. Looking past the racism of the time it was written in, just as I do with the sexism of many other books, it is an enjoyable story.It's light hearted without being lightweight and convoluted. I really liked.I just have one suggestion. For most of this story, I listened to the librivox reading of this, and here and there throughout it, the quality drops, then the last reader was so awful that she spoiled the last two chapters. Honestly, unless you need an audiobook, stick to text. And if you do ne [...]


    9. Quite a delightful read and not quite what I expected. This is not the 3-wishes-genie-in-a-bottle type plot, but in the same genre. The young man's reaction to the genie is rather funny and while the plot follows the wishes that results in disaster plot line, it does it in it's own manner.I am reading next another of this authors books, Vice Versa which was the first take on the Father/Son switch plot that was later seen in the movie of the same name (which did not credit the author) and Big.Ava [...]


    10. This is an old one I happened to find on eNYPL very funny treatment of just how wrong it can go if you let the genie out of the bottle. There's also apparently a 1964 movie based on this, with Tony Randall and Burl Ives. And I see in the description that the author also wrote "Vice Versa," a body-switching-with-a-relative story (one of my favorite movie genres) that has a Judge Reinhold/Fred Savage 80s film version. This F. Anstey is the unacknowledged father of zany Hollywood.


    11. An excellent genie in a bottle yarn, charming old-fashioned fun, exactly the kind of thing I was hoping for when I began to read F. Anstey. A young architect purchases a brass bottle and finds himself in an Arabian nights story as a genie wrecks havoc and ruins his social life in turn of the century London.


    12. Quaint, fun read. There wasn't a dull moment as the hapless Ventimore clings on to his morality, and the Djinn Fakrash never fails to concoct increasingly absurd dilemmas under the guise of 'rewards'. The novel is fast paced and avoids the prolixity of most authors of the time.




    13. A very good example of the light humourous novel of the late Victorian period. Other similar authors are Ernest Bramah (The Wallet of Kai-Lung) and Jerome K Jerome (Three Men in a Boat).


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