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Morning Miracle: Inside the Washington Post A Great Newspaper Fights for Its Life

Morning Miracle Inside the Washington Post A Great Newspaper Fights for Its Life An in depth look at the Washington Post from a Pulitzer Prize nominated Post veteran Morning Miracle definitively answers the question Do newspapers still matter with a resounding yes What The Kingdom

  • Title: Morning Miracle: Inside the Washington Post A Great Newspaper Fights for Its Life
  • Author: Dave Kindred
  • ISBN: 9780385523561
  • Page: 336
  • Format: Hardcover
  • An in depth look at the Washington Post from a Pulitzer Prize nominated Post veteran Morning Miracle definitively answers the question Do newspapers still matter with a resounding yes.What The Kingdom and the Power did for the New York Times, Morning Miracle will do for the Washington Post A reporter for than forty years, Dave Kindred takes you inside the heart oAn in depth look at the Washington Post from a Pulitzer Prize nominated Post veteran Morning Miracle definitively answers the question Do newspapers still matter with a resounding yes.What The Kingdom and the Power did for the New York Times, Morning Miracle will do for the Washington Post A reporter for than forty years, Dave Kindred takes you inside the heart of the legendary newspaper and offers a unique opportunity to see what it really takes to produce world class journalism every day Granted unprecedented access to every nook and cranny of the paper, including candid exchanges with its most celebrated journalists, such as Bob Woodward, Sally Quinn, David Broder, and former executive editor Ben Bradlee who gave the book its title , Kindred provides a no holds barred look at the twenty first century newsroom As it becomes difficult to maintain journalistic integrity, stay relevant in the age of blogs, and meet Wall Street s demands for profits, the newspaper than any other medium also shoulders the tremendous responsibility of acting as a watchdog for democracy Perhaps no one sums up the overwhelming challenges that face the Post and its power to endure better than the author himself It is still a miracle that you can put 700 overcaffeinated misfits in a newsroom, on deadline, adrenaline running, secrets to spill, and before midnight a messenger delivers a smoking hot city edition to Don Graham s manse in Georgetown.

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      Published :2020-07-23T12:07:26+00:00

    About "Dave Kindred"

    1. Dave Kindred

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    665 Comments

    1. I couldn’t wait to get my hands on this book. Although not a reader of The Washington Post, I am well aware of the reputation of this great periodical and the legends who work there, both past and present. How is it faring in an era when newsprint is being steadily replaced by websites and blogs? How is it changing to meet these challenges?Author Dave Kindred first takes us through the early years of The Post. And that is where he lost me. His sketches of people and events seemed, well, sketch [...]


    2. This book reiterates the fact that good journalism is part and parcel of a thriving democracy. The Washington Post has provided that many times over the years and the author gives some good examples, over and above the standard Watergate one. I have sporadically read the Washington Post during visits to Washington, which is one reason I bought this book. I do find the Washington Post to be a quality newspaper.The author is a writer for the Post, so being an insider he provides us with many insig [...]


    3. At the beginning of this book the author thought that he would be "writing a valentine to journalism" the craft he loved and practiced for over forty years but as one of his subjects, Pulitzer Prize winner Gene Weingarten, opined the book did kind of turn out to be "about a great newspaper dying with dignity".



    4. I heard of this book some time ago, but only recently received it through interlibrary loan. Kindred mainly chronicles on how The Post has tried to navigate the decline of print and rise of the internet, which is a important subject and one of special interest to me. That being said, I thought the book was very disjointed and focused too much on individuals and the handling of specific stories. The book was released in 2010, so it doesn't bring the story up to the present day. That makes me want [...]


    5. Charts the decline of the print edition of the Post in the online age, before the Bezos buy out. Definitely for the faithful subscriber audience familiar with Post writers, editors and publishers; lots of insider scoop.


    6. This book's description indicates that the author answers the posed question of "whether newspapers matter" with a resounding YES. I disagree.First, journalists writing about their craft frequently display an inordinate amount of vanity about their profession. In two separate sections of his book, Kindred complies with this unwritten mandate. In discussing the reporting of two major tragedies, he remarks uncritically that the Post writers on the scene (9/11 and the VaTech shootings) found the ex [...]


    7. I just couldn't wait to read this when I saw it. I've been a news junkie all my life; came by it naturally since my mother was too. Our political leanings were totally opposite, leading to countless debates, er, arguments about politics. I grew up in the state capitol of Illinois so there was plenty to argue about, and every Sunday we went downtown to get the Chicago Tribune which only added fuel to the fire.As an adult I was a journalist myself at several newspapers through the years, only leav [...]


    8. There was a time when the city newspaper was delivered to my front yard every morning, and I was actually pretty good about reading it every day. Then the kids got older and our schedules got more hectic, and I started to notice that days and days would go by when I never took the morning paper out of its plastic sleeve. Eventually, we stopped our subscription, promising ourselves that we would still buy the Sunday paper. And then even that came to an end. And at the same time in an almost perfe [...]


    9. Dave Kindred gives some of the history of the Washington Post and tells a little about the editors and reporters that have worked on the paper. I found the story a bit choppy because he seemed to skip around the time line of the papers' history. The history of the paper, I'm sure, is long and deep and to cover it all in one book would be virtually impossible. The author could only pick a handful of reporters and their stories to cover and I feel he did a fair job of that. Dave Kindred was a spor [...]


    10. I have always had an interest in journalism and Dave Kindred takes you inside on of the greatest purveyors of it, the Washington Post. I found myself going back and reading paragraphs twice because of all the great anecdotes and quotes from WaPo legends like Bradlee, Downie, Weingarten and the Graham's. He really gives you an understanding behind the people who have made the Washington Post the paper it is. He makes you wish you could spend a day watching the Washington Post newsroom in its heyd [...]


    11. Man, what a great insider's look at how a major metropolitan paper runs. We meet people who have devoted their entire lives to journalism because they want THE TRUTH, and only a paper like the Post has the resources to do it. Kindred had access to all the major players in this snapshot of a paper in crisis but not decline. I almost feel like the book came out too early, because the story really isn't over. I want to know what happens next, whether the Post's new publisher can move past her initi [...]


    12. My enjoyment of this book has more to do with my context and book's content rather than the quality of the story telling. While it is somewhat difficult to follow the non-monotonic time line and lack of smooth transitions between topics it is easy to see how smoothing it all out might be out of scope. I consume very little mass media and know next to nothing about the news business, paper or otherwise. I do teach a course in the social implications of computing, of which this book gives a good c [...]


    13. I could not stand to read this book; writen in conversational forum (so I walked over to the desk and asked . . ) and nothing put complaining about how the Washington Post was at its' best during the 70s, 80s and 90s and then the Internet is killing the newspaper. Didn't have any ideas on how to solve the problem except fire people and work more hours.No ideas on how to innovate, no ideas on how to stop subscribers from unsubscribing. Only idea was the fire people and work harder.It's a book lik [...]


    14. A fast-paced, engaging read. Kindred delves into the history of the Post and the people behind it, both past and present. While he certainly doesn't hide his personal love for the Post, he is not afraid to explore the newspaper company's lows (as well as, of course, its highs). I half-expected Morning Miracle to be like an unexciting history book but was instead pleasantly surprised to find myself thoroughly engrossed in all the drama and sub-stories. The underlying, overarching theme about the [...]


    15. For some reason had it in my head that this was about the Post in the late 70s. Still an interesting read, though the last chapters made for a difficult read so soon after the 2016 election.


    16. I recently received this book, and while I was not sure how exciting the life of a newspaper could be, I was dead wrong. I totally enjoyed the book. Dan Kindred made the characters and history come alive for me. I am more an online type of person and seeing the effects on an entire industry was very eye opening for me. It was a little slow starting for me, as I had to learn the key players, but as I progressed, the pages turned faster than I realized! I would highly recommend this book to anyone [...]


    17. Informal writing style, almost slap-stick in parts, very conversational. Made you feel like you were almost in the room with Kindred and all his Postie co-horts. As one would expect from a lifelong journalist, excellent pace and structure to book, good ties from section to section. He tries to go easy foreshadowing the Post's demise and lingers on the excellent journalism and whatnot, but you definitely get the picture that the Post is losing losing losing $ $ $ and won't be in print forever. An [...]


    18. This was a great modern newspaper book. I've always liked reading the WaPo and it's fascinating to me to see how one of the few dailies I respect failed to do the right thing with the Internet years ago. Working at a midsized daily during that time, I see the same problems in Post management that I saw in N&O mgmt. Realize I'd have been probably equally frustrated had I ended up there a few years ago. There are some great newspapering lines in this book, and there are also a lot of pieces th [...]


    19. The author, who has been devoted to newspaper journalism for over 40 years takes the reader inside the Washington Post newsroom. He shares triumphs and challenges in maintaining high standards and stay relevant in the climate of instant internet news and blogs. He interviewed 100+ people and highlights some historic events. Good read!


    20. A wonderful love letter to newspapers that isn't afraid to get a little ink under its fingers as it digs to find out how a paper compromises and condenses to survive in the modern climate. Almost a cautionary tale about what happens when good journalism goes underfunded.


    21. Account of recent developments at the endangered Washington Post. Interesting for an ex-Postie like myself, but I thought he tended to romanticize journalism and journalists, and especially Post journalists. I enjoy reporting and editing as much as the next guy, but.


    22. This book contains very detailed information about The Washington Post.Lots of interesting stories and a good view of journalism in general. I received this book for free through First Reads.


    23. An extraordinary read! After reading this book, one absolutely appreciates the work of journalists who strive to inform the public of the sociopolitical world in which we now live and the publishers who strive to print that information !


    24. I loved this book. I particularly enjoyed the author's descriptions of how some of the Posts' award-winning reporters and columnist constructed their pieces, from the original idea, through the research and writing.


    25. Misleading title, but filled with a lot of inside information about the plight of the Post in this period of decline in newspapers. Sounds like there would be answers--i.e. the miracle, unfortunately there are none.


    26. Kindred's journalistic style and talent for story telling makes this a fast paced read. Each chapter is like a short story concerning an incident in news making history. He put an index at the end so the reader can refer back to any subject (i.e. Watergate, Iraq, etc.).Wonderful!


    27. This was give a very insightful view on how the newspapers a struggling with all the internet access for new. I did however find it a bit slow and hard to get in to.



    28. Lives up to its billing - tells the story of the Post up to today in an entertaining fashion. Wish it were more chronological - it moves around in time with no apparrent reason.


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